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‘The Sounds We Wake Up to’: Longtime ‘Morning Edition’ host Bob Edwards dies at 76


Bob Edwards began his career at NPR as a newscaster and then anchor All circumstances have been considered before moving morning edition.The picture above is a photo he took in 1989.

Max Hirshfeld is at NPR


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Max Hirshfeld is at NPR


Bob Edwards began his career at NPR as a newscaster and then anchor All circumstances have been considered before moving morning edition.The picture above is a photo he took in 1989.

Max Hirshfeld is at NPR

Bob Edwards, veteran broadcaster and long-time host morning edition The man who left an indelible mark on the voice of NPR has died. He was 76 years old.

NPR’s Susan Steinberg said Edwards’ voice is part of the morning routine for millions of Americans.

“He’s Bob Edwards morning edition For 24 1/2 years, we wake up to his voice,” she said.

When listeners first hear this voice, they may picture an authoritative figure, an avuncular news reporter wearing a pinstripe suit. no Bob Edwards.

He is a perfect journalist

Margaret Low in 1982 as a morning edition Production Assistant. Currently CEO of WBUR in Boston, he served as senior vice president of news at NPR for three years. She said Edwards would always walk in the door at 2:30 a.m. but he was casual.

“He was tall and thin and wore jeans and, if I recall correctly, I think he almost always wore an untucked flannel shirt.”

Lowe said Edwards’ apparent casualness belied seriousness – about broadcasting, about journalism and especially about the art of writing. Like several of his contemporaries at NPR, he studied writing at American University under former CBS reporter Ed Bliss.

“He often said that while he was writing, Ed Bliss sat on his shoulders,” Lowe recalled.

In fact, Edwards’ office in Washington, D.C., ignored CBS News.

“My overall impression of Bob sitting in his office on M Street was that it was dark outside because it was the middle of the night, and he was facing the window with CBS News above him,” Lowe said. “He would type. On his manual typewriter, he had these really, really big keys, and they would click, click, click, and behind him you would hear…the wires of the AP and Reuters.”

Lowe said Edwards was a consummate journalist.

“He was a journalist, and I think he had a deep understanding of journalism,” she said. “In a way, he set the standard for how we approached the news because he would do it in a simple way. But conveying these stories in a rigorous way.” There’s real depth and making sure they resonate in some way. And this condition is long-lasting. “

“As an NPR listener, I will always remember Bob Edwards’ deep, warm baritone and his confident and easy delivery,” NPR President and CEO John Lansing said in a statement. speech. …” NPR President and CEO John Lansing said in a statement. What sets audio journalism apart from other media is its audience, and for decades it has been a trusted voice in the daily lives of millions of NPR listeners. “

“Mr. Cool” and the red barber

Edwards began his career at NPR as a newscaster and then as a host All circumstances have been considered and Susan Steinberg. She said their styles sometimes clashed.

“We had five wonderful years together, even though it was hard, until we found our rhythm because he was Mr. Cool, he was Mr. Authority, and he was direct. I was a guy with a million ideas and Laughing New Yorkers. But we did adjust pretty well.”

Steinberg remembers Edwards’ humor, a trait that frequently surfaced in his hundreds of interviews with newsmakers, writers, musicians and singers.

One of Edwards’ longest broadcast relationships is also one of his listeners’ favorite: his weekly conversations with sports radio legend Red Barber.

In 1992, sports broadcaster Red Barber spoke with NPR’s Bob Edwards. Edwards talks to Barber every week Morning Edition.

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Associated Press


In 1992, sports broadcaster Red Barber spoke with NPR’s Bob Edwards. Edwards talks to Barber every week Morning Edition.

Associated Press

Edwards eventually wrote a book about his radio friendship with Barber, the first of three books he would write, including a memoir, Voice in the Box: My Radio Life.

Edwards’ approach sets the tone for NPR

Edwards left NPR after the company decided to eliminate him as host morning edition.Although he has many fans Outcry, Edwards played his final show on April 30, 2004. He concluded his tenure with an interview with one of his broadcasting heroes, Charles Osgood.

“You were the first person I interviewed morning editionI hope you’re the last one,” Edwards told Osgood on the broadcast.

Edwards continues to host his own interview show on Sirius XM Radio and continues to be heard on many public radio stations. Bob Edwards Weekend. But Margaret Low said his contribution to NPR will never be forgotten.

“He set the tone and the standard for us all,” she said. “He understood the power and intimacy of our media and captured the attention of millions of people who are still with us today. Together.”



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