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‘Rwanda cares deeply about refugees’, minister tells House of Lords in debate – UK Politics Live


Interior Minister says ‘Rwanda cares deeply about refugees’

“Rwanda is a country that cares deeply about supporting refugees,” says interior minister Lord Sharpe of Epsom.

“We believe that the terms of the treaty, which have been carefully agreed with the Rwandan government, will be binding in international law and are sufficient to ensure the safety and protection of those resettled under the partnership without the risk of refoulement,” he explain.

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Thank you for following the live blog tonight. We will now pause our live politics coverage until Rishi Sunak’s GB News interview begins at 8pm.

Interior Minister says ‘Rwanda cares deeply about refugees’

“Rwanda is a country that cares deeply about supporting refugees,” says interior minister Lord Sharpe of Epsom.

“We believe that the terms of the treaty, which have been carefully agreed with the Rwandan government, will be binding in international law and are sufficient to ensure the safety and protection of those resettled under the partnership without the risk of refoulement,” he explain.

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Baroness Jones of Moorescombe Called Rwanda’s bill “ridiculous”.

“I think this is a ridiculous bill,” she said. “It’s dirty and inhumane and I don’t want to be a part of it.”

Today we’re talking about how to make the inhumane #luandabier Safety. Sadly, this is not possible and despite all the good work we have done, the government will force it through.
Tomorrow, the Victims and Prisoners Bill! https://t.co/MtvyinUrka

— Jenny Jones (@GreenJennyJones) February 12, 2024

and far from the Lord, Andy Haldane – Former Chief Economist bank of england – Labour’s decision to abandon its £28bn a year green spending pledge will be discussed on Sky News tonight.

“I think it’s a shame,” he told Sky’s Sophie Richie, “It’s big, it’s bold, it’s ambitious.”

Andy Haldane, head of the RSA and a former chief economist at the Bank of England, told me that Labor’s sudden U-turn on £28bn of green spending was “a shame” because “we really need this investment”

Full interview at 7 p.m. #political center pic.twitter.com/AQAqGoGvaJ

— Sophie Ridge (@SophyRidgeSky) February 12, 2024

Labor and Tory peers warn Rwanda bill sets dangerous precedent

PA Media’s response to the Conservatives and labor Peers have warned they believe the bill could set a dangerous precedent.

Beyond the comments of Labour’s former justice minister Lord Falconer of ThorotonConservative peers Lord Tugendhat Claims the bill could affect perceptions that the UK “is a great place to do business because we have such great respect for the rule of law”.

“I’ve been an MP on and off for a long time, I’ve been a member of the Conservative Party for about 66 years, and I have to say I think it’s quite unusual that Margaret Thatcher’s party should be proposing something like this. Bill,” said Lord Tugendhat.

Lord Tugendhat added: “What we are being asked to do really represents behavior that the world associates with dictators and despots, rather than with established democracies, the mother of all parliaments. This is a bill we shouldn’t even be asked to face, let alone pass.”

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Lord Falconer of Thoroton The bill “fundamentally straddles the separation of powers” and will set a bad precedent for the country’s future.

“Don’t listen to this,” he said, “this is not a fundamental change in our constitution — it is, and will be, the basis for a lot of bad things to come.”

PA Media has some fuller quotes from the former Tory leader Michael Howard He spoke against proposed amendments to Rwanda’s deportation scheme in the House of Lords. Shami Chakrabartithis archbishop of canterbury and Brenda Hale Their names, and particularly their view that UNHCR should play some role in advising the Secretary of State on issues in Rwanda. He said:

The plain fact is that we are a parliamentary democracy. This means that Parliament is sovereign, and the reason so many of us cherish this first principle is that we place a high value on accountability.

The word accountability was not an important word in the second reading debate in the House of Lords. The courts are accountable to no one, a fact they proudly claim; many of the agencies to which Parliament has outsourced some of its responsibilities in recent years have little to no accountability. Accountability; but Parliament itself – or at least the other place, the House of Commons in which I was privileged to serve for 27 years – does have a responsibility.

He was responding to Chakrabarty, who said at the start of the debate that the bill “threatens both the domestic rule of law, particularly the separation of powers, and the rules-based international order”.

she says:

I don’t think the Government want to put the British executive in conflict with our Supreme Court or our international legal obligations.The amendments in this group are therefore intended to provide a way out of the deadlock for well-meaning people from both sides of your Lordships’ House.

She said the proposals meant no one would be deported to Rwanda under the government’s plans “unless two conditions are met”.

She added: “The first condition is that UNHCR recommends that Rwanda is now safe, for example, due to the successful implementation of promised reforms and safeguards in the asylum system. The second condition is that this recommendation has been implemented .” has been submitted to both Houses of Parliament. “

  • That’s my Martin Belam for today. It was a crash course in how we address our peers in the Guardian style guide, that’s for sure. I will now hand over the work to my colleague Vivian Ho. I’ll be back and see you tomorrow, Andrew Sparrow enjoy a well earned rest.

Christopher ChessonThe Bishop of Southwark said “we cannot make such a mistake” and that courts and tribunals must be able to make judgments about Rwanda’s safety, rather than legislating this. He said the government was taking “unreasonable risks” in sending people to Rwanda at the moment.

Aminka spiralAppointed to the House of Lords by David Cameron in 2014, he said giving UNHCR a role in the adjudication process on Rwanda or other security issues would show a valuable signal of Britain’s commitment to international institutions.

Lord Howard of Lymney He went on to argue that the Supreme Court’s decision was not a “finding of fact,” but a “finding of opinion,” with which fair-minded people might disagree.He also said that none of the amendments were signed by the Supreme Court labor He was not surprised by this as he said no political party aiming to govern would give their name to them.

baroness mitch The speech raised concerns from the Bar that the law was contrary to the European Court of Human Rights.

baroness hanway She said it was “counterintuitive” for liberal Democrats like herself that the bill would require only “minor tweaks.”





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