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Napping coyote reluctantly leaves perfect sunbathing spot on San Francisco patio



So much for making a sleeping dog lie.

This week, a San Franciscan woke up to take in the city views from his outdoor patio, only to find a “beautiful coyote” taking a nap on his couch.

The dog felt so comfortable on the elevated patio that it made little attempt to escape when the homeowner approached.

The homeowner, worried that the animal’s lethargic behavior suggested it was sick or injured, called the city’s animal control department.

It turns out the coyote just doesn’t want to give up the perfect sunbathing spot.

“When I arrived, I made contact with the resident and they took me to their backyard and showed me the coyote, which was resting comfortably on a couch on their outdoor patio,” Animal Control Officer Mullen said. I wrote on Facebook.

There are about 100 coyotes in San Francisco.
Animal Care and Control San Francisco/Facebook

“I approached the coyote and started talking to him, telling him it was time to get up. He looked at me, stood up, stretched and walked to the edge of the yard.”

The coyote reluctantly walked to the edge of the yard, which connected to a wooded area, and jumped back into the brush.

Mullen noted that the animal was moving normally and showed no signs of illness or injury.

The homeowner, worried that the animal’s lethargic behavior suggested it was sick or injured, quickly called the city’s animal control department.
Animal Care and Control San Francisco/Facebook
As the homeowner approached, the coyote made zero attempts to escape.
Animal Care and Control San Francisco/Facebook

“The coyote appears to be a young, healthy male that may have been recently evicted from its den and was trying to move through the city,” he wrote.

Coyote pups typically stay with their parents for about a year and a half before venturing out on their own.

The department said fall and early winter are typically when “yearlings” begin leaving their home dens and looking for mates to build their own dens.

There are approximately 100 coyotes in San Francisco, and they are key to controlling the rodent population.

Big city coyotes are not unique— New York City’s population has recently ‘expanded their turf’ There have been several recent sightings of these four-legged friends in Claremont Park in the Bronx.



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