Sports

ESPN broadcast tips Dodgers pitching against Cardinals in interview with Kiké Hernandez


Well, that’s a problem.

ESPN hosted an in-game interview with Kiké Hernandez on Sunday to reveal the results of the Los Angeles Dodgers vs. St. Louis game. cardinals.

Here’s the thing.

When the Cardinals took the lead in the top of the third inning, ESPN went to Hernandez for an in-game interview with broadcasters Karl Ravech, David Cone and Eduardo Pérez. During the interview, Hernandez was playing ball and manning third base.

Hernandez’s PitchCom debut

He answered questions about opponents and provided game commentary at the plate along with Cardinals rookie Victor Scott II. Scott reached first on an infield single, which put Hernandez at third.Hernandez then showed up PitchCom Speakers his ears. has a problem.

“I need to turn the PitchCom up. I can’t hear you,” Hernandez said.

“You guys,” in this case, was the ESPN broadcaster who was also within earshot.

As soon as he did, a new voice was added to the broadcast that seemed to say “Fastball, go away.”

Hernandez then asked, “Can you hear me?”

they can. Lavezzi responded: “I think they’re talking about fastball, away from home.”

The next pitch comes from Gavin Stone It’s a 95 mph four-seam fastball.

This continued throughout the inning, with the mysterious voice loudly announcing “changeup,” “fastball in,” and “fastball out” multiple times. Each time, the call coincided with an incoming pitch.

Meanwhile, Hernandez continues to answer all questions about the weather. Los Angeles and whether rally banana Will return to Dodger Stadium.

To the viewer, none of this is particularly compelling. But the reveal of the upcoming pitch did. The inning continued without interrupted interviews or slanted pitches.The Cardinals put three men on base and Paul Goldschmidt Take orders.

It seems unlikely that the Cardinals will take advantage of the chaos. Any delay in live streaming renders the information useless. But still. This is an issue that should and will definitely be addressed. It wouldn’t have been an issue in the first place without the persistence of in-game interviews.

The interview was a stunt that went from an All-Star game to a major game. It’s a step away from the broadcast evolution of dugout and sideline interviews that rarely had any interest or consequences for viewers at home — except for Sunday’s interview with Hernandez.



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